Poet meets blogosphere

“It felt desperate, it felt like need, desire, and want all sprouting up from the cold earth. It was to me, very much what it is to have a deep, wounding crush. There was something very human about it, those look-at-me fruit begging to be taken.”

Ada Limon’s poem “Crush” appears in the New Yorker summer fiction issue, and it’s a good one. “For starters,” she writes at one point, “it was all / an accident, you / the right branch / and a sort of light / woke up underneath / and the inedible fruit / grew dark and needy. / Think crucial hanging. / Think crayon orange.” Just as cool is that Googling her leads to her Blogspot blog, where you find her happy over the publication and then linking to a thoughtful S.F. Examiner interview about the poem.┬áThat’s where I found the opening quote here, with Limon discussing the persimmon tree metaphor in the work.

Same with this one: “Yes, it is very much a love poem. It is, however, not a traditional love poem. I wanted to convey desire, physicality, sensuality, but then I also wanted the poem to have a sense of denial of touch, of distance. In the final lines, I wanted the poem to move beyond the great uncomfortable ‘want’ of love and move more into the love of letting go, the love that goes beyond desire and opens into that universal hum. I wanted the tree/speaker to start to move on, to move away, but with that one last offering always remaining.”

3 thoughts on “Poet meets blogosphere”

  1. wow. i thought the best persimmon poem would always and forever belong to li-young lee:
    http://www.poetryfoundation.org/archive/poem.html?id=171753
    it has always been one of my favorites. it lacks the fever of limon’s but there’s a quiet sensuality to it and an awed reverence for physicality, the weight of bodies, the feeling of words on the tongue, the texture and taste of the fruit.

    beautiful in its own right and a worthy companion to limon’s crush.

  2. Great poem. How come they never write stuff like this about eggplants? Or Ocean Spray could host a cranberry poetry contest.

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