I love the New Yorker, but…

Good for the Post Story Lab. Steve Hendrix noticed this line in a New Yorker blog item and posted about it: “The biggest play of the game may have been Alex Ovechkin’s open-ice demolition of Jagr, which led to a quick Russian goal and an arena-wide gasp (it was the hockey equivalent of the collapse of the North Tower).”

Like Hendrix, I’m a big fan of NYer writer Nick Paumgarten, but what a bizarre comparison. One other blogger thought the same: “I mean, I love me some Ovechkin talk on newyorker.com, but this may be a tad inappropriate.” (The one funny thing was Hendrix’s initial post title, still reflected in the URL: “But what can he do with curling?”) No one else on the Internet seemed to notice. I posted the line and Story Lab link on Facebook yesterday, and friends were similarly mystified.

But as the day rolled on, friend Andy noticed the New Yorker quietly removed the North Tower reference. No explanation, no note. The line lost its parenthetical and joined with the next sentence, “The biggest play of the game may have been Alex Ovechkin’s open-ice demolition of Jagr, which led to a quick Russian goal and an arena-wide gasp, but Datsyuk’s defensive work, as resolute an expression of skill as any spinorama or one-timer, was the secret to Russia’s success.”

Not a cool way to edit online, New YorkerSee the post here.

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